Parent - Your role as the parent is to find out what kind of lifestyle your child will have with this disorder. Find out how long your child will live, if they will be able to have children of their own, and if their children will be affected. If you were to have more children, is it possible that another child will be affected by the same disorder?

It is extremely important for people with HD to maintain physical fitness as much as possible, as individuals who exercise and keep active tend to do better than those who do not.
The term chorea describes how people affected with the disorder writhe, twist, and turn in a constant, uncontrollable dance-like motion.
There is a 50-50 chance that HD is transmited to the children
In some individuals, the disease may begin with uncontrolled movements in the fingers, feet, face, or trunk. These movements - which are signs of chorea - often intensify when the person is anxious. HD can also begin with mild clumsiness or problems with balance. Some people develop choreic movements later, after the disease has progressed. They may stumble or appear uncoordinated. Chorea often creates serious problems with walking, increasing the likelihood of falls.
The disease can reach the point where speech is slurred and vital functions, such as swallowing, eating, speaking, and especially walking, continue to decline. Some individuals cannot recognize other family members. Many, however, remain aware of their environment and are able to express emotions.
Some physicians have employed a recently developed Unified HD Rating Scale, or UHDRS, to assess the clinical features, stages, and course of HD. In general, the duration of the illness ranges from 10 to 30 years. The most common causes of death are infection (most often pneumonia), injuries related to a fall, or other complications.
The rate of disease progression and the age at onset vary from person to person. Adult-onset HD, with its disabling, uncontrolled movements, most often begins in middle age.